In Super-businesses we try to find the business that suits your tastes and preferences, and at the same time be profitable, and go according to your budget. Also that allows you to obtain the expected success in the future.

Unlike the popular belief that businesses sell because they are bankrupt, the reality is that there are multiple reasons why a landlord wants to sell it. Some of these reasons are:

 

  • The owner is tired or bored with the business, and feels that he must energize himself by changing his activity.
  • The time or desire for retirement has reached the owner, and he does not see the possibility of someone succeeding him.
  • The owner plans to start another type of business, perhaps with a different schedule, a shorter time of dedication, something that goes with his personality or his tastes and preferences.
  • Sometimes the owner may have personal health problems or a family member so it requires money or time for the business to continue.
  • The owner plans to move out of residence, or the business is far removed from his location, and he wants to run a business closer to him.
  • There may be problems between the partners that caused them to want to sell the business and separate.
  • The owners have no heirs that can continue the business. The owner does not have the capital required by the business.
  • The owner may have some family problems such as divorce, financial problems, etc., which prevent him from continuing with the business.
  • The owner wants to expand to other markets.
  • The owner does not have the knowledge required to manage the business efficiently.

 

The sale reason that the owner has is not as important as the purchase reason that the investor would have in acquiring the business. A business can be bad for someone, and a jewel for another. In our experience, potential investors are better equipped than sellers, because they will better assess the weaknesses of the business, are likely to have fresh capital to make the necessary adjustments to the success of it, and may have the necessary skills for its operation , or that have the human capital that is required for the efficient management of the business.

 

Sometimes it is not the business that is bad, but the person who owns it.   Worldwide, small and medium businesses change owners every 5 years on average, which is not a calamity. It is a reality of the market.